5.24.2011

Mind fuck

I just rewrote my node/linked list entry classes in C syntax and it became way cleaner to read, let me realize that certain commands weren't necessary and how to simplify the overall API. You see, C is cool! C++ is out! Plus the fact that it's easier to structure in my head. I learned to think like a computer - I don't need all those fancy object models! OOP sucks! However, good simple C code (not beeing confused with good complex C code) is either completely value-oriented, plainly memory-based or structure-based with a set of functions for this structure. So the latter way is simply like EVERY normal object-oriented layout with methods and data members. Virtual tables are simple function addresses and not more. I can't believe how there are still peple believing and praising how simple object-oriented programming is. It's a matter of what you told beginner programmers is a good way to structure your program. Or let's correct this by saying that it depends on how they prefer to design their programs. I learned using QBasic and RPGMaker first - procedural and event-based programming (even if the RPGMaker2000 was quite limited). I also took a look at object-oriented programming languages, but at the age of 12 I wasn't really able to understand the concept of object orientation! So where is this "easier programming" now? For a total beginner, it's always easier for him to grasp that a computer needs to be instructed by commands to do something! This is how reality works and how you instruct people to do stuff. Alpha and Omega, you know... whatever. And therefore, if you don't try to be a lazy bum who doesn't want to learn how somethings works (you'll ALWAYS need instructions for your program), you'll always the most easiest and most comftable way to program by knowing (and telling) in what order stuff has to be done and how. It's a matter of facts and computer basics. Interestingly, even those Java programmers who don't like non-object-oriented languages create code that's totally simply be done in C or so with exactly the same amount of tech behind. The difference? Well, you need more code and restrictions for your classes - one way the languages tries to force your programming style to get right. If you can't do this on your own, I think it's totally fine. Otherwise... good question. Do you believe in what you're used to?

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